Saturday, September 26, 2009

WHALE UPDATES and interesting titbits

 

Dear All

 

Whale Watching has been spectacular this season, with the regular operational hazards in-between driving US crazy, but something we handle without you even knowing we went through those stresses.

We’ve been blessed with regular sightings of mother-calf pairs, extra Southern Right bonus visits overall Humpbacks behaving very well for memories that will last a lifetime!

Keep on sending those clientele – and t.h.a.n.x.x.x. for your continued support!

Remember whale watching STARTS beginning of JUNE and carries until 1st/2nd week in DECEMBER.

 

Don’t always let overcast conditions outside put your client off, don’t tell your clients we’re not operating due to what what what what, please leave the cancellations-due-to-rough-seas-decision for us to make, we will know when conditions are unsafe to operate and will then cancel.

 

WHY ARE CETACEANS BORN TAIL FIRST?

So they don’t drown! The birth of a young whale or dolphin takes place underwater, of course, and can last a few hours. If it was born head first the calf would be unable to breathe until it was free from it’s mother and may drown.

 

ARE WHALES BORN IN NURSERIES?

Sometimes. A number of whales, including the southern right whale, use sheltered bays and other protected areas along the coast as nurseries where they can safely give birth to and care for their calves. Some of the favorite nurseries of the southern right whale include sheltered areas between False Bay and Algoa Bay in South Africa, in the Great Australian Bight and also off Warrnambool in Australia.

 

CAN WHALES HAVE TWINS?

YES! In fact, they can even have triplets, but this is very rare and it is highly unlikely that all the calves will survive. Most whales and dolphins carry their unborn calf for about a year, and produce only one calf every two to three years. Female killer whales and pilot whales give birth to only four to six calves in a life-time, and stop breeding when they get older. This is rather unusual as most other whales breed throughout their adult life.

 

WHALE BEHAVIOUR AT CAPE VIDAL

Some of you and your guests observed whales just behind the backline at Cape Vidal last week, the tail last week up in the air, and staying like that for a looooong time, just lying deadstill – we did have some request about WHAT this whale was doing - ???? – it’s called SAILING – at times whales position themselves head down in the water with their tail flukes being exposed above the surface. This could be a form of display using the tail as a sail, but it might also be a form of thermoregulation, allowing heat to dissipate through the tail.

 

Okeeeeeeeeee – enough for one day – I’ll give more interesting info next week –

KEEP IN TOUCH!

WARM REGARDS
RIETTE

advantage@zululink.co.za

035 5901259

  

 

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